Q1 2020 Cyber Attacks Statistics

An Infographic is also available here.

After the statistics from March, it’s time to analyze the data collected in the first three months of this troubled 2020.

The Monthly Attacks chart confirms two trends: the number of events is constantly growing (and the COVID-19 themed campaigns played an important role), and February is always a particularly active month (maybe because crooks want to recuperate the time lost during the Christmas break).

The following charts compare the distribution of Motivations (Q1 2020 vs the entire 2019). It is interesting to notice that the percentages are nearly identical.

The following chart shows e the Monthly Distribution of Motivations broken down across the different categories for Q1 2020.

Malware leads the chart of Top 10 Attack Distribution chart:

Individuals are still the preferred targets for crooks according to the Target Distribution Chart.

The following chart (Motivations by Sector) shows the breakdown of motivations for each target sector:

The following chart (Attacks by Sector) shows the breakdown of the different attack techniques for each sector.

The following charts shows the breakdown of the attack techniques for the top 4 sectors:

The following charts shows the breakdown of the motivations for the top 4 sectors:

As always, bear in mind that the sample refers exclusively to the attacks included in my timelines, aiming to provide an high level overview of the “cyber landscape”.

Keep on supporting the blog, and of course follow @paulsparrows on Twitter for the latest updates. Also feel free to submit remarkable incidents that in your opinion deserve to be included in the timelines (and charts).

One thought on “Q1 2020 Cyber Attacks Statistics

  • April 21, 2020 at 8:34 am
    Permalink

    “Individuals are still the preferred targets for crooks according to the Target Distribution Chart”.
    This is bad especially in these times of CORONA VIRUS when employees work from home in a growing number. Attackers do not need to target directly the companies, but individuals connected to companies network working – for example – from BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) that are less secure than companies’ laptops.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Gabriel Dumitrescu Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: